Linguistic "Xenohomophobia" in Sixteenth-Century France: The Case of Henri Estienne

$10.00
SKU: 1524771867005

Henri Estienne (also Henricus Stephanus, called le Grand) is one of the most important printers, editors, dictionary writers, philologists, and religious controversialists of the sixteenth century. This essay argues that allegations of unmanliness and sodomy against (Catholic) Italians-in short, forms of "xenohomophobia" inform not only his writings that participate in the post-Reformational controversies of his day, but they enter deeply also into his philological speculations and observations. Estienne's gendered speculations and prejudices were adapted to use in England.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

Ornamental Flourishes in Giordano Bruno's Geometry

$10.00
SKU: 1524771361487

What was Giordano Bruno thinking when he unleashed a flurry of hearts, moons, stars, ivy leaves, and flowers into nearly seventy-five geometric diagrams in two of his most mathematical treatises, the Articuli centum et sexaginta adversus huius tempestatis mathematicos atque philosophos and De triplici m?nimo et mensura? Not only is this kind of detailed ornamentation difficult to accomplish on a woodblock; it is most unusual for a printed work of geometry in any period of European history. The restless Bruno must have had a good reason to engage in such a labor-intensive project.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

Bastards in the German Nobility in the Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Centuries: Evidence of the Zimmerische Chronik

$10.00
SKU: 1524771049263

Many scholars have stressed the favor shown to the bastard sons of noblemen, particularly in the "golden age of noble bastards" in the fifteenth century This article examines the position of noble bastards in Southwest Germany, using the Zimmerische Chronik (written in the 1560s) and regional studies of counts and barons in Swabia and Franconia in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

"We do not have it, and we do not want it": Women, Power, and Convent Reform in Florence

$10.00
SKU: 1524770636354

This article discusses the introduction of Tridentine reform in Tuscan convents, in particular the implementation of enclosure and the subsequent reactions of nuns. In Tuscany, Tridentine laws coexisted with disciplinary measures sponsored by the church and the state concerning the government of convents. Enclosure laws were enforced through negotiations within local communities involving both ecclesiastical and state authorities and the nuns, who expressed their discontent and sometimes refused to live under lock and key.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

"Mio malinchonico, o vero ... mi? pazzo": Michelangelo, Vasari, and the Problem of Artists' Melancholy in Sixteenth-Century Italy

$10.00
SKU: 1524770291117

This article concerns attitudes to melancholia and melancholic painters in the literature of the arts from sixteenth-century Italy, and focuses primarily on the writings of Giorgio Vasari, with some attention also to texts by Pino, Dolce, Lomazzo, and others. Remarks made by these authors are analyzed in relation to other sources of primary evidence, ranging from a carnival song to a treatise by Marsilio Ficino on "black bile," the humor supposed to cause melancholia.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

A Painting, a Poem, and a Controversy about Women and Love in Paris in the 1530s

$10.00
SKU: 1524769979882

Two anonymous and little known works of art from sixteenth-century France, a poem of 1545, "Les Obseques d'Amour," and a somewhat later painting now in the Louvre, Les Fun?railles de l'amour, have in common their portrayal of the funeral of Cupid, the god of love, a theme otherwise unknown at the time and one which has resisted modern attempts to explain its meaning. This article proposes that in both cases Cupid's burial is a metaphor for the rejection of carnal love by a group of Parisian women then charged with sexual immorality and that the painting is derived from the poem.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

Seduction by Promise of Marriage: Law, Sex, and Culture in Seventeenth-Century Spain

$10.00
SKU: 1524769580375

Historians agree that early modern Spaniards' sexual behavior deviated significantly from norms set forth in royal and canon law. The question of how Spaniards resolved the tensions between their sexual norms as encoded in law and their nonnormative sexual behaviors has yet to be addressed. This essay argues that seventeenth-century Spaniards mitigated such tension by using laws and legal systems to transform deviant behavior into acceptable behavior when it was culturally expedient.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

Mutations of the Androgyne: Its Functions in Early Modern French Literature

$10.00
SKU: 1524769313328

The Androgyne takes its name from the myth in Plato's Symposium. Gen. 2, where man and wife are to be one flesh, gives us the marriage androgyne. From Gen. 1, in which Adam is male and female, we have another sort of androgyne, this one purely of the spirit. Drawing on these sources, Renaissance writers made use of the androgyne as a figure of desire (both heterosexual and homosexual), of marital fidelity and marital infidelity, and of the soul seeking union with the divine.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

Rabelais and Marguerite de Navarre on Sixteenth-Century Views of Clandestine Marriage

$10.00
SKU: 1524598312068

Scholars have wondered why Rabelais dedicated his Third Book (1546) to Marguerite de Navarre, since the book is filled with ridicule of women. In attempting to discover why Rabelais might have done this, the following essay suggests that he and Marguerite shared an interest in marriage, and in particular, they both opposed clandestine marriage, then under discussion by the Council ofTrent.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

Heinrich Bullinger, Marriage, and the English Reformation: The Christen state of Matrimonye in England, 1540-53

$10.00
SKU: 1524598049634

Much work has been accomplished in recent years on the relationship between the English and continental reformations, but research is focused primarily on the impact of Martin Bucer and Peter Martyr Vermigli on English theologians and university students during the reign of Edward VI. Comparatively little has been written about Heinrich Bullinger, whose writings, translated into English more frequently than Bucer's or Vermigli's, reached a wider English audience.

List price: $0.00
Price: $10.00

Pages

Subscribe to Sixteenth Century Journal RSS