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Journal > Volumes > 36 (2005) > 2 (Summer)
2 (Summer)
NOTE: Book reviews will be included in issue download
Gender in the Chambers of Rhetoric in the Southern Low Countries

The chambers of rhetoric in the Low Countries were amateur guilds or confraternities of laymen especially devoted to the composition of vernacular poetry and drama. The members were trained to perform not only in the semiprivate sphere of their chambers, but also in the public sphere, often in the context of civic festivals. This article asks if women had access to this formal literary culture...

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The First Parliament of Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary, Queen of Scots promised to make a parliamentary religious settlement when she returned, as a Catholic, to her newly Protestant realm of Scotland in 1561. She then delayed summoning a parliament until 1563, and the summons, when it came, was engineered by her leading Protestant adviser, the earl of Moray. However, when parliament assembled, Mary outmaneuvered Moray with a series of well-...

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Visionary Experience, Medical Discourse, & the Inquisition in Spain

This article analyzes the role of medical discourse in assessing the veracity of visionary experience in Golden Age Spain. Focusing on the Inquisition’s prosecution of suspected impostors, it describes the ways in which medicine could function as a tool of ecclesiastical discipline. The central argument is that by emphasizing the role of physiological factors in the genesis of many seemingly...

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Melanchthon’s Doctrinal Last Will & Testament

The day before his death (18 April 1560) Philip Melanchthon designated in his will that his Responsiones ad articulos Bavaricae inquisitionis, composed a year earlier, should be his final confession of faith. Directed primarily against the theology of articles prepared for an ecclesiastical visitation by the government of Bavarian duke Albrecht V, this treatise criticized the Roman Catholic...

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Friedrich Förner, the Catholic Reformation, & Witch-Hunting in Bamberg

Friedrich Förner, a principal architect of the Catholic Reformation in Bamberg, is especially remembered for his 1626 treatise on witchcraft, Panoplia Armaturae Dei. An examination of the full range Förner’s writings reveals a common logic that underlay his approach to the problems of witch-hunting and Catholic reform. From a historical perspective, the rise of witchcraft and Calvinism...

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Friedrich Förner, the Catholic Reformation, & Witch-Hunting in Bamberg

Friedrich Förner, a principal architect of the Catholic Reformation in Bamberg, is especially remembered for his 1626 treatise on witchcraft, Panoplia Armaturae Dei. An examination of the full range Förner’s writings reveals a common logic that underlay his approach to the problems of witch-hunting and Catholic reform. From a historical perspective, the rise of witchcraft and Calvinism...

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Sodomy, Sexual Economies, & Inquisitors in Spain

This article explores the Aragonese Inquisition and its prosecution of homosexual sodomy in terms of the types of men tried and the attitudes of both local denouncers and inquisitorial magistrates, given the important separation of the judicial process into denunciation and trial. The diverging views regarding sexuality and deviance between Aragonese peoples and the judges manning the...

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Book Burning in Tudor & Stuart England

This article treats book burning and censorship in England between the 1520s and the 1640s as part of the communications repertoire of the early modern state. Combating heresy, blasphemy, and sedition, Tudor and Stuart authorities subjected transgressive works to symbolic execution at key sites in London and the universities. The addition of the hangman to the ceremony in the 1630s reinforced...

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